Not A Space Odyssey

Not A Space Odyssey

Yes, this is a giant, seemingly floating baby. It is a ten metre long sculpture by Marc Quinn called Planet and it was installed in front of the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco last summer.

The weight of this painted steel and bronze sculpture rests effortlessly on the baby's right hand and immediately brought to my mind the iconic baby from Kubrick's 2001 A Space Odyssey. A young child, floating in space. A theory for the movie is that the baby represents the first being that will follow what we are–what people are. The next evolutionary step that allows us to finally go beyond our infantile limitations as humans.

Marc Quinn says idea of the sculpture is that the baby, a likeness of the artist's new born son, is a play on weight and weightlessness. It clearly is massive and must weigh accordingly. The weightless effect is gained not only by making a singular point of contact with the base but through the utterly relaxed pose of the child and especially in that relaxed right arm. It's not nearly as ambitious a statement as what Kubrick and Clarke (may have) been making, but it suffices for me. Not for all: the explanation, and the work itself, have received mixed reviews.

Such is art.

My other photographs of sculpture can be found in the gallery.

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EXIF

Camera: NIKON D80
Lens Type: 70.0-300.0 mm f/4.5-5.6
Focal Length: 70 mm
35mm Focal Length: 105 mm
Exposure: 1/200 sec
Aperture: f 8
ISO: 100


Taken: 2012-08-14 14:25:02
Posted: 2013-03-07 | 17:02





Not A Space Odyssey

Not A Space Odyssey

Yes, this is a giant, seemingly floating baby. It is a ten metre long sculpture by Marc Quinn called Planet and it was installed in front of the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco last summer.

The weight of this painted steel and bronze sculpture rests effortlessly on the baby's right hand and immediately brought to my mind the iconic baby from Kubrick's 2001 A Space Odyssey. A young child, floating in space. A theory for the movie is that the baby represents the first being that will follow what we are–what people are. The next evolutionary step that allows us to finally go beyond our infantile limitations as humans.

Marc Quinn says idea of the sculpture is that the baby, a likeness of the artist's new born son, is a play on weight and weightlessness. It clearly is massive and must weigh accordingly. The weightless effect is gained not only by making a singular point of contact with the base but through the utterly relaxed pose of the child and especially in that relaxed right arm. It's not nearly as ambitious a statement as what Kubrick and Clarke (may have) been making, but it suffices for me. Not for all: the explanation, and the work itself, have received mixed reviews.

Such is art.

My other photographs of sculpture can be found in the gallery.

Show this photo on a map ✈

EXIF

Camera: NIKON D80
Lens Type: 70.0-300.0 mm f/4.5-5.6
Focal Length: 70 mm
35mm Focal Length: 105 mm
Exposure: 1/200 sec
Aperture: f 8
ISO: 100


Taken: 2012-08-14 14:25:02
Posted: 2013-03-07 | 17:02


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