Not a Kid's Ride

Not a Kid's Ride

At one point on our flight back from Barcelona, the captain mentioned that we would be passing by the Matterhorn. Cool, except that when I looked out the window, I just saw mountain after mountain after mountain.

I knew that the Matterhorn isn't the tallest mountain in the Alps, that's Mont Blanc, but I thought that it would at least be the taller than the mountains that surround it. Nope.

It turns out that Monte Rosa, that giant, bulky series of peaks in the background, kind of overshadows the Matterhorn. For what its worth, the Matterhorn is the sixth highest peak in the Alps. The main peak of Monte Rosa (the Dufourspitze) is the second highest and the peak just right of top centre in this photo, Liskamm, is the fifth. So, in this photo you can see three of the highest peaks in Europe and, as if that wasn't enough, at the top centre is the location of the highest mountain hut in Europe. It's a little small to actually see in the photo but, trust me, it's there.

Completely unknown to me, Leonardo da Vinci made a trek to the Italian side of the Monte Rosa, the backside of it from the perspective of this photo, and may have used them as the inspiration for the "rocks" in his Madonna of the Rocks paintings. I guess his visit shouldn't be too surprising because the Swiss-Italian border winds its way through this whole photo. That knife-edge ridge leading to the tip of the Matterhorn is the border, then it continues up that series of peaks to the top of the photo. That plain in the background, it's Italy. If you could see far enough, you'd see Milan.

Anyway, the Matterhorn is easy to miss, if you don't exactly know what you're looking for—which I didn't. But, I've seen pictures of it (not recently, though) and I've been to Disneyland and I even rode on the Matterhorn ride (not in a very long time, though) so, when I saw this peak, I thought, 'I think that's it, maybe?'.

It is.

The fascination with the Matterhorn is more about its pyramidal top and not so much with its height. Its reputation probably also has to do with how difficult it is to climb—something like five hundred people have died in the past 150 years or so trying to get to that pointy top. Not a kid's ride, indeed. But, you can ski and snowboard there. Just on the other side of its pointy peak there is a pretty huge resort. At the very left edge of the photo, you can see the diagonal like of a road or track slant its way up a face. Then, if you look clear all the way over to the right edge, you will see a high plateau which also has tracks on it. So, amazingly, pretty much everything between those two tracks is part of this resort. They say there are 360 kilometres of runs and 54 lifts. Holy, that's huge.

Looks like the Matterhorn just made my list of things to do.

My other photographs taken from airplanes can be found in the gallery.

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EXIF

Camera: NIKON D90
Lens Type: 70.0-300.0 mm f/4.5-5.6
Focal Length: 86 mm
35mm Focal Length: 129 mm
Exposure: 1/100 sec
Aperture: f 8
ISO: 100


Taken: 2013-12-10 13:22:06
Posted: 2016-01-06 | 19:23





Not a Kid's Ride

Not a Kid's Ride

At one point on our flight back from Barcelona, the captain mentioned that we would be passing by the Matterhorn. Cool, except that when I looked out the window, I just saw mountain after mountain after mountain.

I knew that the Matterhorn isn't the tallest mountain in the Alps, that's Mont Blanc, but I thought that it would at least be the taller than the mountains that surround it. Nope.

It turns out that Monte Rosa, that giant, bulky series of peaks in the background, kind of overshadows the Matterhorn. For what its worth, the Matterhorn is the sixth highest peak in the Alps. The main peak of Monte Rosa (the Dufourspitze) is the second highest and the peak just right of top centre in this photo, Liskamm, is the fifth. So, in this photo you can see three of the highest peaks in Europe and, as if that wasn't enough, at the top centre is the location of the highest mountain hut in Europe. It's a little small to actually see in the photo but, trust me, it's there.

Completely unknown to me, Leonardo da Vinci made a trek to the Italian side of the Monte Rosa, the backside of it from the perspective of this photo, and may have used them as the inspiration for the "rocks" in his Madonna of the Rocks paintings. I guess his visit shouldn't be too surprising because the Swiss-Italian border winds its way through this whole photo. That knife-edge ridge leading to the tip of the Matterhorn is the border, then it continues up that series of peaks to the top of the photo. That plain in the background, it's Italy. If you could see far enough, you'd see Milan.

Anyway, the Matterhorn is easy to miss, if you don't exactly know what you're looking for—which I didn't. But, I've seen pictures of it (not recently, though) and I've been to Disneyland and I even rode on the Matterhorn ride (not in a very long time, though) so, when I saw this peak, I thought, 'I think that's it, maybe?'.

It is.

The fascination with the Matterhorn is more about its pyramidal top and not so much with its height. Its reputation probably also has to do with how difficult it is to climb—something like five hundred people have died in the past 150 years or so trying to get to that pointy top. Not a kid's ride, indeed. But, you can ski and snowboard there. Just on the other side of its pointy peak there is a pretty huge resort. At the very left edge of the photo, you can see the diagonal like of a road or track slant its way up a face. Then, if you look clear all the way over to the right edge, you will see a high plateau which also has tracks on it. So, amazingly, pretty much everything between those two tracks is part of this resort. They say there are 360 kilometres of runs and 54 lifts. Holy, that's huge.

Looks like the Matterhorn just made my list of things to do.

My other photographs taken from airplanes can be found in the gallery.

Show this photo on a map ✈

EXIF

Camera: NIKON D90
Lens Type: 70.0-300.0 mm f/4.5-5.6
Focal Length: 86 mm
35mm Focal Length: 129 mm
Exposure: 1/100 sec
Aperture: f 8
ISO: 100


Taken: 2013-12-10 13:22:06
Posted: 2016-01-06 | 19:23


Tags & Categories