Burrard and Robson

Burrard and Robson

This shot is a little dated as Virgin Records is no longer there. I think it's an HMV, but I haven't bothered to even look. I pass by there almost daily but I don't pay attention to what stores are what anymore. It's not like I buy CDs anymore - I think the last one I bought was sometime around 1999.

I do remember going in there to check out Radiohead's release "Hail to the Thief" and noticed that it had DRM on it so I immediately put it down and walked out. Way to go RIAA, CRIA.

I can't make it clear enough: Why would I pay for something that gives me less functionality than I can get for free? If I can't play it on my computer, my iPod, or any other device I damn well please, I'm not going to buy it. That's called fair use and it's my choice, my right.

Back in the day I was extremely into music - I do have over 700 CDs - so it's not like you can say that I haven't supported the industry. The business has changed, but the industry hasn't. Get over it guys, change or die. This is the age of artist control and direct distribution, there is no need for you anymore.

I think a large part of the problem is that with the switch from tape to CD and VHS to DVD, you have a generation or two of entertainment industry execs that believe that the profits they have seen over the past fifteen years or so are the way it's supposed to be. It's not. You were just lucky. You aren't going to make huge money any more sitting on your ass because people are re-buying their music in a new format.

The best part is that companies like Sony get nailed price fixing for years, stealing millions of dollars from consumers, and engage in practices like payola which allows the acts that they want to promote to dominate the airways and shut out independent artists. Then, to stop people from using the music they purchased in the ways that the consumer wants to, they use the "root kit" which installs software without the consumer's knowledge (flat out illegal in most jurisdictions), that is a security risk and a total invasion of privacy as it reported every time the disk was played back to the company.

And they call the downloaders criminals.

Fuji Velvia 100, scanned, colour corrected, sharpened in Photoshop CS3.

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Posted: 2007-01-15 | 17:51





Burrard and Robson

Burrard and Robson

This shot is a little dated as Virgin Records is no longer there. I think it's an HMV, but I haven't bothered to even look. I pass by there almost daily but I don't pay attention to what stores are what anymore. It's not like I buy CDs anymore - I think the last one I bought was sometime around 1999.

I do remember going in there to check out Radiohead's release "Hail to the Thief" and noticed that it had DRM on it so I immediately put it down and walked out. Way to go RIAA, CRIA.

I can't make it clear enough: Why would I pay for something that gives me less functionality than I can get for free? If I can't play it on my computer, my iPod, or any other device I damn well please, I'm not going to buy it. That's called fair use and it's my choice, my right.

Back in the day I was extremely into music - I do have over 700 CDs - so it's not like you can say that I haven't supported the industry. The business has changed, but the industry hasn't. Get over it guys, change or die. This is the age of artist control and direct distribution, there is no need for you anymore.

I think a large part of the problem is that with the switch from tape to CD and VHS to DVD, you have a generation or two of entertainment industry execs that believe that the profits they have seen over the past fifteen years or so are the way it's supposed to be. It's not. You were just lucky. You aren't going to make huge money any more sitting on your ass because people are re-buying their music in a new format.

The best part is that companies like Sony get nailed price fixing for years, stealing millions of dollars from consumers, and engage in practices like payola which allows the acts that they want to promote to dominate the airways and shut out independent artists. Then, to stop people from using the music they purchased in the ways that the consumer wants to, they use the "root kit" which installs software without the consumer's knowledge (flat out illegal in most jurisdictions), that is a security risk and a total invasion of privacy as it reported every time the disk was played back to the company.

And they call the downloaders criminals.

Fuji Velvia 100, scanned, colour corrected, sharpened in Photoshop CS3.

no geodata found

EXIF

Camera: N/A
Lens Type:
Focal Length: N/A
35mm Focal Length:
Exposure: 0 sec
Aperture: N/A
ISO: N/A


Taken: N/A
Posted: 2007-01-15 | 17:51


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