Palazzo Vecchio

Palazzo Vecchio

For a short while, this palace was the seat of government for a newly unified Italy. That might actually be one of the least interesting things about the Palazzo Vecchio.

More interesting is that this is the home of the statue of David, THE Statue of David by Michelangelo. It sat outside, right at the entrance for nearly 400 years. Now, there is a replica in it's place which you can see here. It's the middle of the three statues. To the right of David is Hercules and Cacus, 1534, by Baccio Bandinelli and to the left is the Fountain of Neptune, 1565, by Bartolomeo Ammannati.

Sovonarola was burned to death here in 1498, after three weeks of torture, in the exact same spot where he had commanded the Bonfire of the Vanities to be the year before. Before his death, he was held in a room in the Palazzo's tower. Machiavelli watched the burning and wrote about it. That is the same Machiavelli who is forever known for his nonjudgemental descriptions of abuses of power as a means to an end in "The Prince".

More upbeat is the fact that basically every major renaissance artist came here and has looked at this vista - with some minor alterations - that you are seeing now.

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EXIF

Camera: N/A
Lens Type:
Focal Length: N/A
35mm Focal Length:
Exposure: 1/125 sec
Aperture: f 8
ISO: 220


Taken: 2009-05-24 07:28:06
Posted: 2010-11-08 | 08:37





Palazzo Vecchio

Palazzo Vecchio

For a short while, this palace was the seat of government for a newly unified Italy. That might actually be one of the least interesting things about the Palazzo Vecchio.

More interesting is that this is the home of the statue of David, THE Statue of David by Michelangelo. It sat outside, right at the entrance for nearly 400 years. Now, there is a replica in it's place which you can see here. It's the middle of the three statues. To the right of David is Hercules and Cacus, 1534, by Baccio Bandinelli and to the left is the Fountain of Neptune, 1565, by Bartolomeo Ammannati.

Sovonarola was burned to death here in 1498, after three weeks of torture, in the exact same spot where he had commanded the Bonfire of the Vanities to be the year before. Before his death, he was held in a room in the Palazzo's tower. Machiavelli watched the burning and wrote about it. That is the same Machiavelli who is forever known for his nonjudgemental descriptions of abuses of power as a means to an end in "The Prince".

More upbeat is the fact that basically every major renaissance artist came here and has looked at this vista - with some minor alterations - that you are seeing now.

Show this photo on a map ✈

EXIF

Camera: N/A
Lens Type:
Focal Length: N/A
35mm Focal Length:
Exposure: 1/125 sec
Aperture: f 8
ISO: 220


Taken: 2009-05-24 07:28:06
Posted: 2010-11-08 | 08:37


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