Pasqualone is Attacked

Pasqualone is Attacked

UPDATE: *The BBC has a really cool article about Caravaggio and the murder he committed that in a roundabout way led to his death. Hint, the death sentence didn't kill him, news that the death sentence had been rescinded did. Odd, no?

Quicktime VR version below but don't forget to read the description that is below that.

In July of 1605 Mariano Pasqualone was assaulted as he walked through the Piazza Navona in the dark of late evening. He was hit in the head with the hilt of a sword and, as he fell to the ground, was only able
to get a glimpse of a man with a black cape running away. There were witnesses to the crime but no one was able to really identify the attacker.

Even without a good look, Paqualone knew who it was though. A few days previous he had had words with a short tempered, violent man who regularly wore a black cape and carried a sword.

The argument was over a girl, a girl named Lena, and the person he argued with was Michelangelo da Caravaggio.

Caravaggio had a tremendous ability to get right up in your face, both with his paintings and, if you crossed his path, in person. Caravaggio's Rome was the gritty Rome full of whores, thieves, drunks and
worse and those were the people who inhabited his paintings. Even the paintings commissioned by the church. When he painted The Calling of Saint Matthew he had Christ in a dark and dingy bar selecting
Matthew. For Doubting Thomas, Christ is literally demanding belief by forcing Thomas' hand into Christ's own wounds. And when he painted Mary, he painted her as very clearly being dead. Many
questioned his stability but none questioned his talent.

Now the Piazza Navona is full of paintings but none have anywhere near the impact of what Caravaggio created. Surrounded by the paintings for the tourists and the tourists themselves is the Fontana dei
Quattro Fiumi complete with Egyptian obelisk by Gian Lorenzo Bernini. It sits in front of the basilica, Sant'Agnese in Agone, which was designed by Bernini's longtime rival, Francesco Borromini. The
fountain and the church predate the largest part of the rivaly (which really became an issue when Bernini just about collapsed the facade of Saint Peter's Basilica with an ambitious dual bell tower design
and Boromini came in to fix it) but it's interesting that they are so close and were only built a few years apart.

And that is only the more recent history of this piazza. It started out as the Circus of Domitian, built in the first century AD. Boromini's church is named after Saint Agnes who was martyred here in the year
304. She was 12. There are many stories about her martyrdom but my favourite involves her blood pouring into the stadium and Christians soaking up the blood with cloths. Now her skull is kept in
this very church in a side chapel.

Her body though is in another church about six kilometres away.

Now the summers are full of sightseers and, at this time of year, there is a Christmas market. Not so exciting now that we know some of what has gone on here, no?

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Camera: N/A
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Exposure: 1/125 sec
Aperture: f 8
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Taken: 2009-05-26 15:29:53
Posted: 2010-12-14 | 11:33





Pasqualone is Attacked

Pasqualone is Attacked

UPDATE: *The BBC has a really cool article about Caravaggio and the murder he committed that in a roundabout way led to his death. Hint, the death sentence didn't kill him, news that the death sentence had been rescinded did. Odd, no?

Quicktime VR version below but don't forget to read the description that is below that.

In July of 1605 Mariano Pasqualone was assaulted as he walked through the Piazza Navona in the dark of late evening. He was hit in the head with the hilt of a sword and, as he fell to the ground, was only able
to get a glimpse of a man with a black cape running away. There were witnesses to the crime but no one was able to really identify the attacker.

Even without a good look, Paqualone knew who it was though. A few days previous he had had words with a short tempered, violent man who regularly wore a black cape and carried a sword.

The argument was over a girl, a girl named Lena, and the person he argued with was Michelangelo da Caravaggio.

Caravaggio had a tremendous ability to get right up in your face, both with his paintings and, if you crossed his path, in person. Caravaggio's Rome was the gritty Rome full of whores, thieves, drunks and
worse and those were the people who inhabited his paintings. Even the paintings commissioned by the church. When he painted The Calling of Saint Matthew he had Christ in a dark and dingy bar selecting
Matthew. For Doubting Thomas, Christ is literally demanding belief by forcing Thomas' hand into Christ's own wounds. And when he painted Mary, he painted her as very clearly being dead. Many
questioned his stability but none questioned his talent.

Now the Piazza Navona is full of paintings but none have anywhere near the impact of what Caravaggio created. Surrounded by the paintings for the tourists and the tourists themselves is the Fontana dei
Quattro Fiumi complete with Egyptian obelisk by Gian Lorenzo Bernini. It sits in front of the basilica, Sant'Agnese in Agone, which was designed by Bernini's longtime rival, Francesco Borromini. The
fountain and the church predate the largest part of the rivaly (which really became an issue when Bernini just about collapsed the facade of Saint Peter's Basilica with an ambitious dual bell tower design
and Boromini came in to fix it) but it's interesting that they are so close and were only built a few years apart.

And that is only the more recent history of this piazza. It started out as the Circus of Domitian, built in the first century AD. Boromini's church is named after Saint Agnes who was martyred here in the year
304. She was 12. There are many stories about her martyrdom but my favourite involves her blood pouring into the stadium and Christians soaking up the blood with cloths. Now her skull is kept in
this very church in a side chapel.

Her body though is in another church about six kilometres away.

Now the summers are full of sightseers and, at this time of year, there is a Christmas market. Not so exciting now that we know some of what has gone on here, no?

Show this photo on a map ✈

EXIF

Camera: N/A
Lens Type:
Focal Length: N/A
35mm Focal Length:
Exposure: 1/125 sec
Aperture: f 8
ISO: N/A


Taken: 2009-05-26 15:29:53
Posted: 2010-12-14 | 11:33


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