The Trocadéro

The Trocadéro

The Palais de Chaillot was built in 1937 for the Exposition Internationale of 1937. Home to several museums now, the first few years of it's existence sawed back and forth between two antithetical themes: war and humanity.

The expo itself, the reason for the Palais in the first place, brought those two themes together right for the opening. Spain's Republican Government had commissioned Picasso to create a painting for it's pavilion and he produced an absolute masterpiece, the huge and epic Guernica. It is Picasso's visceral reaction to the horrors of war and, more specifically, his reaction to German and Italian bombing of the town of Guernica in Basque Country. The painting has since become an international symbol of peace - so much so that when Colin Powell made his infamous, lie filled speech at the UN, where a tapestry version hangs, the Bush administration pressured the UN to cover it up with a blue curtain.

Albert Speer's gigantic Nazi German pavilion provided the counterweight to the Spanish pavilion and the magnificent painting it contained. Germany's attention at the Expo was turned not to Spain, but instead to the Soviet pavilion that sat directly across from it. The pavilions, of course, became shows of strength by both nations.

It was only three years later that Hitler would be photographed standing in the open centre of the Palais with the Eiffel Tower in the background in another iconic image from the era.

After the war, the Palais de Chaillot was where the United Nations General Assembly, in their third ever session, adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The esplanade you see here was named the Esplanade of Human Rights to commemorate the occasion.

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Camera: N/A
Lens Type:
Focal Length: N/A
35mm Focal Length:
Exposure: 1/125 sec
Aperture: f 8
ISO: 200


Taken: 2009-05-31 16:12:47
Posted: 2011-07-11 | 14:39





The Trocadéro

The Trocadéro

The Palais de Chaillot was built in 1937 for the Exposition Internationale of 1937. Home to several museums now, the first few years of it's existence sawed back and forth between two antithetical themes: war and humanity.

The expo itself, the reason for the Palais in the first place, brought those two themes together right for the opening. Spain's Republican Government had commissioned Picasso to create a painting for it's pavilion and he produced an absolute masterpiece, the huge and epic Guernica. It is Picasso's visceral reaction to the horrors of war and, more specifically, his reaction to German and Italian bombing of the town of Guernica in Basque Country. The painting has since become an international symbol of peace - so much so that when Colin Powell made his infamous, lie filled speech at the UN, where a tapestry version hangs, the Bush administration pressured the UN to cover it up with a blue curtain.

Albert Speer's gigantic Nazi German pavilion provided the counterweight to the Spanish pavilion and the magnificent painting it contained. Germany's attention at the Expo was turned not to Spain, but instead to the Soviet pavilion that sat directly across from it. The pavilions, of course, became shows of strength by both nations.

It was only three years later that Hitler would be photographed standing in the open centre of the Palais with the Eiffel Tower in the background in another iconic image from the era.

After the war, the Palais de Chaillot was where the United Nations General Assembly, in their third ever session, adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The esplanade you see here was named the Esplanade of Human Rights to commemorate the occasion.

Show this photo on a map ✈

EXIF

Camera: N/A
Lens Type:
Focal Length: N/A
35mm Focal Length:
Exposure: 1/125 sec
Aperture: f 8
ISO: 200


Taken: 2009-05-31 16:12:47
Posted: 2011-07-11 | 14:39


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