The Castle in Staufen

The Castle in Staufen

Probably built some time in the 11th century, the castle above Staufen seemed to protect the tiny village below it fairly well. You can see the village a bit on the right side of the photo, peeking through the tree. There were some problems with Freiburg to the north that resulted in a successful siege but after a few years of reparations, things went back to normal.

This changed in 1632 when, during the Thirty Years War, the Swedes managed to conquer the area and burn the castle basically to the ground. It was never rebuilt so, aside from four hundred years of overgrowth and wear, this is basically how the Swedes left it.

France is very close - you can see it quite easily from the castle but it's actually out of the photo, off to the right - so the French would periodically invade and pillage. The Napoleonic era wasn't particularly nice here, it's at this point where you start seeing descriptions of Staufen ending with "population scattered into the woods". Sometimes for months.

There was a bit of action in the German revolution of 1848/1849 but by the late 19th century, things had settled down tremendously and descriptions of events contain much happier things involving construction of schools or a public swimming pool.

Now, the biggest problem the village has is that it's rising. Up to thirty centimetres in some spots. They did some drilling for geothermal energy back in 2006 and broke through a geological layer which allowed water to react with the contents of that layer. The result is gas expansion and a lifting of some parts of town. I think they've got it figured out now. I hope so because the old part is really beautiful.

My other pictures of castles (or from them or on their grounds) can be found in the gallery.

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EXIF

Camera: NIKON D90
Lens Type: 10.0-24.0 mm f/3.5-4.5
Focal Length: 10 mm
35mm Focal Length: 15 mm
Exposure: 1/50 sec
Aperture: f 8
ISO: 200


Taken: 2010-11-13 17:00:58
Posted: 2012-01-23 | 15:06





The Castle in Staufen

The Castle in Staufen

Probably built some time in the 11th century, the castle above Staufen seemed to protect the tiny village below it fairly well. You can see the village a bit on the right side of the photo, peeking through the tree. There were some problems with Freiburg to the north that resulted in a successful siege but after a few years of reparations, things went back to normal.

This changed in 1632 when, during the Thirty Years War, the Swedes managed to conquer the area and burn the castle basically to the ground. It was never rebuilt so, aside from four hundred years of overgrowth and wear, this is basically how the Swedes left it.

France is very close - you can see it quite easily from the castle but it's actually out of the photo, off to the right - so the French would periodically invade and pillage. The Napoleonic era wasn't particularly nice here, it's at this point where you start seeing descriptions of Staufen ending with "population scattered into the woods". Sometimes for months.

There was a bit of action in the German revolution of 1848/1849 but by the late 19th century, things had settled down tremendously and descriptions of events contain much happier things involving construction of schools or a public swimming pool.

Now, the biggest problem the village has is that it's rising. Up to thirty centimetres in some spots. They did some drilling for geothermal energy back in 2006 and broke through a geological layer which allowed water to react with the contents of that layer. The result is gas expansion and a lifting of some parts of town. I think they've got it figured out now. I hope so because the old part is really beautiful.

My other pictures of castles (or from them or on their grounds) can be found in the gallery.

Show this photo on a map ✈

EXIF

Camera: NIKON D90
Lens Type: 10.0-24.0 mm f/3.5-4.5
Focal Length: 10 mm
35mm Focal Length: 15 mm
Exposure: 1/50 sec
Aperture: f 8
ISO: 200


Taken: 2010-11-13 17:00:58
Posted: 2012-01-23 | 15:06


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