Opening Rain

Opening Rain

Three years ago, I debated whether or not to go out into the pouring rain and check out the opening of the 2010 Winter Olympics. I decided that I would go and, furthermore, that I was going to buy a new lens to capture the event. So I guess that I've had my trusty 10-24mm Nikkor for three years now as well. Cool. it's served me extremely well.

Its first day was a trial, for sure. I literally took it out of the box in the store, stuck it on my D90, put the box in my backpack and headed out into the rain. And man, was it raining. In no time my camera and new lens were soaked. Yeah, and in no time, I was even more soaked. I tried as best I could to keep the gear dry but it was just not possible.

Without making this sound like an ad for Nikon (but, oh, wouldn't a nice little Nikon ad look pretty on this site? Hmmmm, Nikon?), I trust the weatherproofing on their cameras - within reason. That night, it was getting really close to that edge of reason. In the end, there was no problem and I was able to run around for several hours and snap off about a hundred and fifty shots. I have to say none of them from that evening were spectacular but it does take some getting used to such a wide lens. No matter how close you are to the subject, you can and should get even closer. It's really wide.

But, by the end of the Olympics, I was able to use that lens to shoot gold medalist Charles Hamelin and silver medalist Marianne St-Gelais (genuinely pleasant people to talk to), silver medalist, Kalyna Roberge and the insane celebrations when Canada won hockey gold. The super wide angle was really perfect for that.

Not a bad start for that lens and it hasn't let me down since.

My other photographs taken with the 10-24mm Nikkor can be found in the gallery.

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EXIF

Camera: NIKON D90
Lens Type: 10.0-24.0 mm f/3.5-4.5
Focal Length: 10 mm
35mm Focal Length: 15 mm
Exposure: 1/13 sec
Aperture: f 3.5
ISO: 1250


Taken: 2010-02-12 19:43:23
Posted: 2013-02-12 | 17:05





Opening Rain

Opening Rain

Three years ago, I debated whether or not to go out into the pouring rain and check out the opening of the 2010 Winter Olympics. I decided that I would go and, furthermore, that I was going to buy a new lens to capture the event. So I guess that I've had my trusty 10-24mm Nikkor for three years now as well. Cool. it's served me extremely well.

Its first day was a trial, for sure. I literally took it out of the box in the store, stuck it on my D90, put the box in my backpack and headed out into the rain. And man, was it raining. In no time my camera and new lens were soaked. Yeah, and in no time, I was even more soaked. I tried as best I could to keep the gear dry but it was just not possible.

Without making this sound like an ad for Nikon (but, oh, wouldn't a nice little Nikon ad look pretty on this site? Hmmmm, Nikon?), I trust the weatherproofing on their cameras - within reason. That night, it was getting really close to that edge of reason. In the end, there was no problem and I was able to run around for several hours and snap off about a hundred and fifty shots. I have to say none of them from that evening were spectacular but it does take some getting used to such a wide lens. No matter how close you are to the subject, you can and should get even closer. It's really wide.

But, by the end of the Olympics, I was able to use that lens to shoot gold medalist Charles Hamelin and silver medalist Marianne St-Gelais (genuinely pleasant people to talk to), silver medalist, Kalyna Roberge and the insane celebrations when Canada won hockey gold. The super wide angle was really perfect for that.

Not a bad start for that lens and it hasn't let me down since.

My other photographs taken with the 10-24mm Nikkor can be found in the gallery.

Show this photo on a map ✈

EXIF

Camera: NIKON D90
Lens Type: 10.0-24.0 mm f/3.5-4.5
Focal Length: 10 mm
35mm Focal Length: 15 mm
Exposure: 1/13 sec
Aperture: f 3.5
ISO: 1250


Taken: 2010-02-12 19:43:23
Posted: 2013-02-12 | 17:05


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